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Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Copying Artwork Correctly "the Mechanics" By Rich Franco

Hello to All,

Here is a new tutorial for correctly copying artwork. This first lesson is all about the actual "mechanics" of how to set up the artwork correctly, which is the foundation for the image to be later "tweaked" in Photoshop or some other software editing program. Generally, this step is what causes problems down the line. If the artwork isn't copied correctly to start, then the quality of the image will suffer later, with "soft" spots or out of focus, which is actually out of depth of field(DOF).

Basically, this is just making sure that the front of the lens of your camera, is perfectly in line with the surface of the artwork. Any angle difference, may produce an area that appears out of focus.

So let's start!

Art Prints

Here's a diagram that I hope you can understand! No really, I'm not an very good sketcher!

A. In this drawing, I'm showing that the "middle" of the hanging art work, which in this case is 46" is the exact same middle of the lens, @ 46". This means that the camera and the artwork, are perfectly parallel to each other.
B. The math may not be right, but I'm also showing here that the artwork. looking down, is perfectly aligned to the camera body/lens. If any of those numbers are off, then the artwork isn't perfectly aligned to the camera and an area of "out of focus" could occur.
C. This shows that the artwork is at a perfect 90 degree angle, as is the front of the camera lens.
D. If you are using an easel, instead of this type of stand, then the angle of the artwork on the easel, MUST be duplicated by the angle of the camera/lens. So really, easier if kept at a 90 degree.

Here's the start-up shot. This shows the beginning process and how it looks before the artwork is hung on those "background stands".

Art Prints

1. Level the hanging bar.

Art Prints

2. Level the 2 support bars, if you are using 2. I used 2 here, since the artwork was relatively high, at 24" and there was a bit of wind. These support cross members keep the artwork in a correct 90 degree and prevents the artwork from hanging at a slight angle to the back.

Photography Prints

3. Here's a shot of the artwork and the copy stand, with the support cross members, getting readied to be leveled.

Sell Art Online

4. Now level the top of the artwork. Here, I'm on a slight slope of the driveway, so I adjusted the right side up, about an inch, to get a nice level.

Photography Prints

5.Now level the top of the camera, here I'm using the "hot shoe" which is a nice flat spot.

Photography Prints

6. I left out one photo, where I made sure that the front surface of the artwork was @ a 90 degree, which it was. So here, I'm making the front of the lens, ALSO 90 degrees.

Photography Prints

7. Find the "center" of your artwork. Mine is 24" high, so the "center" is 12", and then mark it with a piece of tape.

Sell Art Online

8.Now, using that "center" mark, measure from the center, to the ground. In this case about 40 1/2 inches.

Photography Prints

9. Now, with that exact distance, from the ground to the center of the artwork, adjust the camera, so the "center" of the lens, is now the same, 40 1/2".

Photography Prints

Congratulations! Your artwork and your camera are now "PERFECTLY" aligned to each other. When you now take or make a copy, everything is parallel to each and will have no areas that are out of DOF or look, to be out of focus.

Here's the final tasks, prior to clicking the shutter.

9. Place a "White of Gray" card in the image. You will use this later, in Photoshop, to perfectly correct any color caste from the quality of light used to copy this artwork. That means both, full sunlight, like this example, over caste light or any man made light. If you do use the outside to copy your artwork, the best time is between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., for the "cleanest light" before and after, it may be cool or too warm. ALSO, align the artwork 90 degrees towards the sun, so that you are not creating any shadows, if you art has any depth to it from the heavy paint. Important!!! REMEMBER TO REMOVE THE WHITE OR GRAY CARDS BEFORE YOU ACTUALLY TAKE THE REAL COPY PHOTO! I didn't always remember!!!

Finally, here is a sample of the gray card. In the middle, is the actual Kodak 18% gray card and then 2 paint chips. Any "white" will work and any neutral gray will work, if it's close to this 18% color/density.

Art Prints

Hope this helps and when I get a chance, will then go into the "photoshop" steps, that use the white/gray card to correct the color balance of your artwork. Or just go to Youtube or read this: http://layersmagazine.com/using-a-gray-card-for-setting-white-balance-in-adobe-photoshop-camera-raw.html

More info here too: http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/rich-franco.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=598941

If you have any questions, just post them here or email them and I'll try and answer them, or find someone that can!!!

Rich Franco

richfrancocars.com

p.s Anyone that can actually DRAW and would like to improve my little sketch, let me know!

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Barbara St Jean

3 Years Ago

I'm bumping this post up. Rich you are amazing! Putting this together, for the all artists, who struggle to get a great image of their paintings. It's very difficult to do and I want to thank you for trying to help.

I wish I lived closer to you, so I could get you to photograph my large canvases that can't be scanned, without stitching together 20 pieces or more...I still have not mastered the art of photographing them properly, but now I will be following your directions while trying to get them captured without glare, distortions or blurriness.

Thanks again,

Barbara

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

3 Years Ago

Suppose someone were to decide to buy a camera, for the sole purpose of photographing artwork for posting on FAA, and they're trying to decide whether they need to buy one, or whether they can get away with using the camera they already have.

What are the minimum specifications for the camera?

Also, Picasa has a "straighten" function. If you photograph your art crooked, you can straighten it. Can using the "straighten" function mess up the photograph?



 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Barbara,

Thank You! Can you see the images??? I can't and assume nobody can yet! Let me know if you have any questions about my "tutorial" and I'll try and answer them. REALLY not hard to do, if you follow my "recipe"!

Cheryl,

IF you already own a SLR or a DSLR, then you're fine. That means that you have a pretty good sensor. The SLR, which is a film camera, has the "original" full frame size that is 35mm or 24x36mm and perfect! The DSLR, probably has a 1.6 sensor factor, for Canon and a 1.5 sensor for Nikon. Here's the image that I use to explain the sensor size,relative to a full 35mm negative or sensor:

Art Prints

The "black" rectangle is the "full frame" sensor or the 35mm film size! The red and blue are the Canon and Nikon sized APC sensors, which you can see how much smaller they are! The purple and yellow boxes are typically what most Point & Shoot cameras have!!! AND ALMOST ALL Smart phones are about a 1/4th the size of the yellow box! Yikes!!! So this gives you an idea of the potential quality of cameras and sensor sizes.

By the way, the sensor factor stuff I talked about is simply this. If you have a Canon DSLR, with a 1.6 factor APS sensor and attach a 100mm lens, what you see through the viewfinder, is what a 160mm lens would show on a full frame sensored camera! 1.6 x 100mm = 160!

This image shows a "normal" full frame lens covering the film or full frame sensor. Since lenses are round, not rectangular, there is ALWAYS image that spills over the sides of the "box". The green box and circle is the smaller APS-C sensor and lens image circle for those cameras.

Photography Prints

This image below shows what happens when you put a lens, designed for a full frame camera or DSLR, on an APS sized sensor, like a Canon Rebel, the image circle covers beyond the actual sensor and thus, appears that your lens is longer, when in reality, it's just cropped, since most of it is on the sides of the sensor!

Sell Art Online

Did I get you totally confused yet?

If budget was a concern and you already owned an old 35mm film camera, I would suggest that you just buy a used macro lens, 100mm or a bit longer and shoot film and then send the film to a "pro" lab, get it scanned and sent back on a DVD/CD, for about $.50 for each negative scanned. I can help with the film choice and where to get it scanned,

Fingers hurt! Break time!

Rich

p.s. As far as the "straighten" function, yes, sometimes I do end up using that tool, but in order to use that tool, you need to crop in and then you loose some of the image, so when I copy artwork, I always try to crop the image very close to the sides, so I can use the full file size and not have to enlarge later, to get back to the original capture size of the camera!

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

If you can't click on those small boxes, then just find my stuff on my site and go to the gallery that says "Photoshop stuff, not for sale", images are in there.

Rich

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

BUMP!

Seems the site is NOW working, so the images now will show up!

Rich

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

BUMP-dity-BUMP!

Images are now there!

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

3 Years Ago

My camera's not DSLR, so... that makes it pretty dicey whether I can get an image that will print. I've done it, but it was by accident not skill, wish I knew what I did.

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Cheryl,

Well, then give us a hint! Is it a P&S or a film camera? What make and model. If you did it once, you can do it again!

Rich

 

Floyd Snyder

3 Years Ago

Great information Rich!

Very nice of you to put this all together. You should write a "For Dummies" book for this and other aspects of the whole process of producing captures for Giclee printing.

 

Gary Warnimont

3 Years Ago

Rich, thank you for going through all this. All 2-d artists need to know how to do copy work,sadly many do not.
Perhaps a discussion about using the proper focal length lens,white balancing technics,light sources, tungsten electronic,flash,LED would be helpful eventually.
You have got folks going in the right direction.Most kind of you !

 

Chuck De La Rosa

3 Years Ago

Rich, though I don't have a need for this, it's an excellent write up that a lot of folks here are going benefit from. Nice work!

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Floyd, Gary, and Chuck,

Glad to share. For many of us "old codgers" this is stuff we did almost blindfolded, or maybe "impaired" in another way! LOL!

Gary, if you go to my site and then the gallery "Copying Artwork" you'll see this and a few other suggestions.

Art Prints

Also, in the "description" how to make what is called "pot stands", no not some place to sell you know what, but stands from an empty gallon paint can, some cement and then a 1x2" sticking up. I had these all over my big studio, cheap and replace expensive $100+ stands to attach stuff to. If you copy art a lot AND have a place to store these, then that's the cheap way to go:

Art Prints

Also, the lights that I use, which are "soft" compact fluorescent bulbs, and some big clamp on reflectors.

Here's the link for the gallery:

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/rich-franco.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=598941

And as far as the right lens, I like a longish macro, 100mm to 180mm and shoot usually around f11, so I know I've got the depth of field covered. The advantage of a macro, is that it has a flat lens and not a curved one. Back in the day, people that copied artwork, had special lenses that were ONLY designed for copying and these had a flat piece of glass on the ends, so no curvature could possibly be created, even if up close,which a normal lens can do.

Also, the length of 100 to 180, let's you get a bit away from the art and you're not right up on top of it, so there's room to get between the art and the camera, to make adjustments and you aren't constantly moving the camera/tripod.

I'll get going on the second part of this, the computer end and how to ALWAYS get the color accurate, with the use of a Kodak Gray card or even just a white board and a single click in photoshop!

Any other suggestions for more of this stuff?

Rich

p.s. I've got a surprise coming! An artist friend has redrawn my original sketches and now, even a caveman can understand them!!! Later tonight,

 

VIVA Anderson

3 Years Ago

Thank you Rich, so much....Ms.V

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Ms. V,

My pleasure! Anything I might try and improve? A better sketch is on the way,

Rich

 

VIVA Anderson

3 Years Ago

Such a great contribution you've made, Rich. I wouldn't know of what to change, with my limited knowledge, seems complete to me, for sure. This is so important to those who sell on pod their originals..........because one can't sell a tweaked original in pod, and sell the untweaked original therefore..........so, at least now, people will have really good photos of their originals...........(me, now, I spend my creative time reinventing my originals for pod,and enjoying the transformations I achieve...........all done electronically, not in the camera....sooo, no need for a good photo, but no need for a bad photo, either, lol)

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Ms.V.,

Maybe the question should be, is there anything that I've posted that could be simpler? Or could go into more depth?

Rich

 

VIVA Anderson

3 Years Ago

Well, Rich..........nope !! ... "good on ya" in the Australian vernacular for 'mate you've done well', which is Australian vernacular too, lol...........I understand it all, so that's saying something!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

Hope you get lots of feedback and a few 'thanks', too............Cheers.....

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Ms.V.,

Thanks for looking and helping. I really want this to be understood by newbies and also oldbies! LOL!

Rich

 

David Smith

3 Years Ago

One caveat. Unless Kodak has made a change recently, don't use a Kodak 18% gray card for color balancing. They were meant for exposure metering only and are not color neutral. I have 3 and none are neutral and they don't even match each other. There are color neutral gray cards designed for digital available.

Also, if you varnish or glaze your work, or use oils that have a gloss finish to them, buy a good polarizing filter for your lens and polarizing gels for for your lights.

 

Nancy Merkle

3 Years Ago

This looks like some great information. I'm going to follow this thread so I can take more time to digest. Thanks so much for the post.

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

David,

Will check out that Kodak graycard info tomorrow. I also have there, the Macbeth Color card on my gallery, which also should have an 18% Gray.

But in reality, might be splitting hairs. Being off a point or two of color, is acceptable, considering monitors and printers.

Polarizing filters can also add a color caste, so we need to test those too. And, if a piece of artwork is lit correctly, then a filter is not needed.

I'll let you know what I find out about the gray card. Of course, a white card should solve that problem,

Rich

 

Gregory Scott

3 Years Ago

There are some problems with illuminating your art with natural light.
If you use shade, the color of shade will be dependent on the objects that are reflecting the light into the shade, such as the tree canopy, nearby building, a cloudy or sunny sky, and so on. For consistency, a good quality artificial light can produce a much more consistent light, which will allow you to choose the correct color temperature and more accurately reproduce the color of your images.

Other problems with open-air setups of this sort are wind and other weather (think sudden rainstorms, etc.).

Consistent conditions, and a more accurate setup are easiest in a studio or other room which is used for that purpose, if it is large enough to achieve the geometry you need. You'll have more need for reflectors and/or diffusers to soften the light, but common materials such as muslin can be used to good effect for such purposes.

Color balance settings, rather than color filters, are likely to be the easiest way to achieve accurate color, so an 18% grey card is the most common/standard way to do this.

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Is it me, or does everybody feel like buying some stuff........?

Rich

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

3 Years Ago

Wow, probably took a long time to type that one. Hope the spammeroid got paid for sending out all that free advertising.

********

Back to cameras... mine is a PS (point & shoot), no film, it has manual and automatic settings. Here goes: Panasonic Lumix 16x optical zoom DMCZS8. How's that for too much information...

My best skills with this camera are getting blurry images - and slightly weird (pixellated maybe?) backgrounds.

The amount of blurry I get is fine for snapshots, not ok for POD purposes - I'm having trouble getting the camera to focus properly - the camera seems to want to do it's own thing. This might not be something people can help me with online -- probably someone would have to be here to see what it is I'm not doing right.

I don't have the first clue what's causing the weird backgrounds - whether that's something I'm doing or a limitation of the camera.

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Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Gregory,

O f course, the "IDEAL" situation is studio lighting, lights and a space dedicated to just copying artwork, which I had set up when I was doing enough of this to keep that set-up, set up! BUT for most artists, investing in a light system, learning that light system, learning HOW to light a subject, is way to expensive and complicated and really, not needed for the majority of artwork copied for FAA. If you were going to submit files for a book or something along those lines, then yes, hire a Pro and let them do it. This is for ALL the others.

As far as the quality of light, Kodak and Fuji state that depending where you live, the time from 10:00 to 2:00 pm, is the best and the closest to mid-day is the BESTEST!

Yes, wind, is worse than rain for me, since if it's going to rain, not worth the effort to set up. But if there is a bit of wind, like it was for this image that I copied outdoors, then a second person or some sand bags are in order:

Sell Art Online

This was a very gusty day and I had my trusty assistant (wife) standing next to the artwork!

And yes, I wouldn't use any "filters" to correct any colors that I would need accurate.

 

Rich Franco

3 Years Ago

Terri,

Welcome! Yes, you can upload jpg or png, which a lot of people do for their Tee shirt art. Are the files you have questions about, from a camera or are they copies of art from a camera?

I always look at my files at least at 100% and work on them at 200% or larger. The longest side, like a 4000 x 6000 file, will generally allow you to print a 60" print. That's a rule of thumb here.

Shower curtains and duvet covers are an exception and can be made from smaller files. You can currently upload 25mbs or close to that size and there is talk, someday of uploading larger files.

If you have specific questions, just ask or email me. Lot's of good people here that can help,

Rich

 

Abbie Shores

12 Months Ago

stickied for a couple of days

 

Rich Franco

12 Months Ago

Thank you Abbie!

Rich

 

Floyd Snyder

12 Months Ago

Thank you Abbie!

I have looked for this upon occasion when people have had questions about getting files made of there originals.

This one of the best guides on all of FAA, IMHO!

 

Bradford Martin

12 Months Ago

One thing I suggest is if you are using outdoor light then photograph on an overcast day. that will eliminate shadows and reduce glare. Or better yet in open shade such as a covered porch or patio. Today's cameras are very good at getting white balance right, so you don't need pure white light. On a cloudy day, if you can manually set the white balance to cloudy, then do that. If you are in the shade there is usually a setting for shade. That should be accurate to most people's eyes.
Of course for the best color accuracy 2 flashes or strobes is best. Scanning is even better if you can do it. But I have used your method many times and instructed others and the results are fine. The diagrams are very useful.

One thing you have to be careful about is cropping off the art while photographing . I leave a tiny amount of background on the tight side and the other side will usually need a good crop. In processing always straighten before cropping. Yes it is likely to be a tiny bit crooked which will be obvious when cropping. No worries, just straighten first, then crop.

 

Ken Krug

12 Months Ago

Rich, thanks for all the great info. How do you feel about photographing artwork vs. scanning it? For some reason I identify more with photographing it.

 

Rich Franco

12 Months Ago

Ken,

I had a large flatbed scanner, Epson and for SMALL stuff, fine, but stitching together large pieces just wasn't that much fun. Today, software probably better, but to me, a full-size sensor and a flat lens, like a macro, works best. When I did this stuff for other artists, usually a 4x5 negative and transparency was the standard.....

Brad,

Good suggestions. That's why I included the white/gray card, to get it most betterer.......

Floyd,
Thanks!
(check's in the mail, just hold it for a few days or so)...

Rich

 

Rich Franco

12 Months Ago

Once again, I would like to thank my Artistic friend, Cheryl, for these amazing sketches she provided!!!

https://cherylemerson-adams.pixels.com/

Rich

 

Ken Krug

12 Months Ago

Thanks Rich.

 

Oksana Semenchenko

11 Months Ago

Thank you, great post!

 

Rich Franco

9 Months Ago

BUMPSKI,

Rich

 

Roger Swezey

9 Months Ago

When I photograph work, I attach the camera to the underside of the tripod, facing straight down, with the subject on the flat surface below.

I have to make sure that the tripod legs or their shadows don't interfere with the photo.

Otherwise, I think this a straight forward way of photographing art.

Note: Most tripods have that feature.

 

Abbie Shores

10 Days Ago

Rich

A while ago you explained why people may not see an exact measurement even when they have made sure the pixels are correct

Like they want a 12 x 18 but get a 12 x 18 blah blah

Can you refresh me on why that was?

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Abbie,

Doesn't ring a bell with me. Must have been somebody adding to the post or thread.....Maybe JC???

Rich

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Abbie,

This image is a good example. Taken with a full frame DSLR, and the eventual image size is 4187 x 6280, produces all the STANDARD sizes, up to and including the 48" x 72" print. Using the full image that comes out of the original capture will give you the correct aspect ratio, 2x3, or produces the 4" x 6" print. In Photoshop, I use that 2x3 to crop, if I need to crop an image.

Art Prints

I think I remember this conversation and I think I said something about adding 5-10 pixels to make the image a perfect size for standard prints....

Rich

 

Sally Trace

10 Days Ago

Abbie, I find that if one of the pixel dimensions have odd last 2 digits, as in 5837, then you get those extra digits on the printing sizes. So I play around until I get a set of dimensions with more rounded numbers, like 5825. Even though 25 is a odd number, it usually works. Ending in 0 is best, but not always easy to get both dimensions to end in 0.

I would like to ask the photographers here about tips for reducing the size of large TIFF files to save as a .jpgs that will be small enough. I do trial and error and it takes forever and I'm always afraid that I'll accidentally save my big TIFF as one of the smaller sizes.

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Sally,

As far as saving large TIFFS, as smaller Jpegs, easy peasy! First, after working on the original image file, which for me is a RAW file., I keep it as a file marked "fixed" and a PSD in the original folder. So in my case shooting a Canon, the RAW file will be saved as "1SOG8755 fixed.psd". Down the road, I know if I want to work on this image again, from the file that I spent some time editing, I just open the "fixed" file.

Then, when I'm finally done working on specific areas of the file, maybe adding an effect or something and it's now ready for upload to FAA, I'll save it to a folder on my desktop, called "For FAA" and when I save it, as a jpeg, will now call it "1SOG8755 Fixed.jpg" and save it as a "12" using Photoshop. If the file is too large, I then select "11" and it will then be smaller, but still great quality for large prints!

I assume most other editing programs also have some function similar to this in Photoshop.

Hope this helps....

Rich

 

Edward Fielding

10 Days Ago

I would change to the title to something like "how to photograph YOUR artwork" or something that doesn't suggest illegal copying.

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Edward,

Some people MIGHT just use this for nefarious ways....LOL!

Rich

 

Abbie Shores

9 Days Ago

Many thanks :-) So odd is the way to go... well that explains my life pretty uncannily so it fits :-)

 

Annette M Stevenson

9 Days Ago

Rich Franco,

Thank you for all the valuable information.

 

Sally Trace

8 Days Ago

Rick Franco, thank you. I never played around with that number. So changing the .jpg quality number from 12 to 11 does not change the pixel size but does reduce the MB to help squeak it in under the 25MB max? I will have to play with this, thank you. Some of my files are enormous because I tile together multiple images to get the detail for big paintings.

Abbie, lol but I think I said it wrong. Pixel dimensions ending in 0 are the best way to go, such as 5800 x 4640, but when it's hard to get the smaller size needed, and retain the aspect ratio AND get the 0 on both numbers, I have found that something like 5885 usually works, but 5887 does not. So not odd numbers but rounded numbers, if that makes any sense. Now that I've said that, I will have to go look at things and figure out if this is accurate. I've never tried to describe it to anyone.

Editing to say, Rick Franco, I just tried the 11-12 thing and it makes an enormous difference in MB size, thank you very much!!!!

 

Lori Kingston

8 Days Ago

Rick, this is wonderful -- thank you so much for taking the time to do this! And Abbie, thank you for pinning it so we could find it!

 

Rich Franco

8 Days Ago

Annette,

You are welcome! For MANY years, copied artwork for local artists in the studio, back in the days of FILM! LOL!

Sally,

Yes neat little trick and discussed here many times, but usually not seen if the entire post/thread isn't read. "SOMETIMES" the uploader isn't looking and I've snuck in a 26 or even a 27 MB sized file, but most of mine are under 25MB when I'm finished in Photoshop.

Lori,

Glad to help. Complicated on the surface, but with a simple "recipe", easier to get right.....

Rich

 

Sally Trace

8 Days Ago

Haha, yes Rich I was not going to mention that. I used to take my paintings to local photographers, but never did find one close to home that could do it right. I have the medium format slides with glare, etc. so I gave that up . So all of my older oil paintings are not documented correctly for me to reproduce :( . Sometimes I get lucky and can use software to alter them into prints I am happy with. Some of my best sellers are done this way. It all takes a lot of time.

 

Rich Franco

7 Days Ago

Sally,

Yes, the very first thing a photographer has to learn, is that those framed pieces of art, BEHIND glass, are really just mirrors! So, keeping light OFF the camera/photographer and the glass is pretty important!!!

Rich

 

Sean Davey

1 Day Ago

This is quite a long thread so I might have possibly missed it, if it was already mentioned but one thing that should be considered when copying artwork is the use of polarizers. I used to be a professional copy technician and using a polarizer is essential in eliminating any reflections and keeping the colors and tones true.

When copying outdoors, it's as simple as using a polarizing filter on the front of your camera, but if you want to set up a professional copy operation indoors, you will also need polarizing filters over your lights. This is done, using large gel sheets of polarizing material. Here's a link to some at B&H camera: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/45130-REG/Rosco_101073001720_Polarizing_7300_Filter.html?sts=pi&pim=Y Just make sure that the filters are aligned the same way on each of your lights.

Another thing to consider too is that a polarizer may add contrast, so if the subject is already contrasty, you might want to dial back the polarizer a bit to achieve the perfect result.

Sean

 

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